Culinary Arts Schools in Washington State

Your high school diploma or GED makes you eligible for a college education and many students dream about a career as a chef. Let’s take a closer look at some culinary education institutions in Washington State.

Are you thinking to enroll in a culinary arts school in Washington and explore the world of becoming a chef or a baker? There are great culinary arts schools in Washington and these fine culinary arts schools can make your dreams come true. If you are in Washington State right now, are very interested in culinary arts,

and wants to become a world-class chef someday, then you are in the right place because Washington State is a hotbed for culinary schooling. Start your culinary career now and choose and find the right culinary arts school in Washington for your culinary arts education and training.

The culinary arts schools in Washington educate and train its students on the principles of how to cook and prepare great food. Culinary arts schools in Washington also help students to become very successful in their quest to becoming a chef or baker in the future.

Vocational training schools, technical trade schools, community colleges, and universities in Washington offer comprehensive culinary arts degrees, courses, classes, culinary arts training programs, and culinary arts certifications. Culinary arts schools in Washington also provide excellent education and training that includes lectures, classroom training, classroom demos, field trips, externships, and hands-on training.

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Top Wine Education at Fresno State

Sure, I know it’s a long way from Illinois to California’s Central Valley but for students interested in the wine industry, Fresno State University offers a one-of-a-kind education. Fresno State Winery produces a wide variety of award-winning wines from the most popular and well-known of varietals such as Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon to up-and-coming varieties like Syrah and Viognier, to lesser-known wines that are made in small batches. Here, students get a Top Wine Education at Fresno State.

Fresno State was the first American university that received a license to set up, operate, and exploit a winery within the school’s overall educational programs.

Fresno State University’s Agricultural Foundation if funding and running the winery. The foundation is a recognized auxiliary organization on the school’s campus and it operates and manages also other agricultural enterprises to support the hands-on learning and training experience for the school’s students.

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Is there a Solution to Wine Bottle Closure?

The cork dilemma all began at the end of the 1990s when the production of wine in the world blossomed in the “New World” countries of the US, Chile, Argentina, and Australia among others.

The demand for natural cork was high and the supply couldn’t meet the demand, likewise, many of the new wineries needed more economical cork solutions to enter into the market at affordable prices, this led to an expanded use of micro-agglomerated corks (natural cork glued together) and technical corks (not 100% natural cork). If you want to learn more about Nomacorc, check out this video:

You all know what happened next, around 10% of all bottles of wine were “corked” or tainted with cork smells. Many solutions have appeared on the market as alternatives to natural cork: screw caps, synthetic corks, Vinolok and Nomacorc.

I had the privilege to meet the Nomacorc team in the annual Enomaq tradeshow in Zaragoza. They presented me with a Sommelier Challenge (kind of like the Pepsi Challenge), a tasting of the same white wine sealed with different models of Nomacorc with different amounts of “Nano-oxynization”.

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Wine and Food Pairing

Trust your mouth. You know what you like; enjoy it

So says Jeffrey Saad, 25-year food industry veteran and restaurateur. I recently returned from a Wine Bloggers Conference where I had the great pleasure of seeing this dynamic personality give a presentation on food and wine pairing. The following video will teach you more about pairing wine and food. Listen to Gerald Morgan Jr, a well-known sommelier at a fine Dallas, Texas, wine shop explain more on the topic:

Now, back to Jeffrey. He asked us who in the audience would pair a Coke with pizza so that he could make a point about why the combination works together. A big laugh came from the crowd when not even one hand went up and he mused, “Wow, you guys really are a bunch of winos!”

Key pointers:

  • Pair acid with acid, such as salad with vinaigrette paired with Grüner Veltliner.
  • Pair fat in food with acid in wine, such as goat cheese in buttery phyllo cups with Argentine Torrontes.
  • Pair protein or animal fat with tannin such as Kobe beef with Cabernet Sauvignon.
  • Pair sweet with sweet. Sweet food spanks the fruit right out of the wine if the wine isn’t as sweet.
  • Pair spice with sweetness. Spice does not like tannin; it accentuates it.
  • Make funky ingredients a part of a dish, not the main flavor.

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Owning your own Wine Farm

Owning a winery is the dream of many a successful businessman. In South Africa, quite a few wineries are privately owned and operated. Not only is the beauty of the Cape Winelands enticing, but what could be more seductive than the thought of serving a wine complete with your own family name and crest? Take a look at this Napa Valley, California, video to get the picture.

But winemaking is a capital-intensive project, and slow on returns. When he went into it almost 30 years ago, Tim Hamilton Russell estimated that it would take 10 years to see a return on capital. The figure has not changed much since then especially now that imported equipment and wooden barrels have to be acquired with our weak rand. So it is rewarding to see South African money being invested in the Cape Winelands when it could so easily be exported for quicker and far better returns.

Relatively new to the industry is another IT man, Dave Lello. He brings a wealth of wine knowledge, having had a keen interest in the subject for most of his life. His enthusiasm for wine is matched by his love of Italy and Africa. And this shows in the name he has chosen for his wine venture, Stellakaya.

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Walla Walla Wine Wine Time Time

Yes, I know, it’s a silly heading. Walla Walla actually uses that same tagline of repeating words to market their wine region. So I borrowed it.  We were fortunate enough to be able to experience the Walla Walla wine region not too long ago and, although we expected good things I don’t think we were quite prepared for what we got.

The wine being produced in Walla Walla is sensational. Even the juice that wasn’t great was still good. Walla Walla is located due South of Spokane, Washington in the Southeast corner of the state.  It’s about a 262-mile drive from Seattle and 158 miles from Spokane. This was our first time in Walla Walla and it was beautiful. We had great weather as the sun was out.

We were able to visit eleven wineries: Woodward Canyon Winery, L’Ecole No 41, Gifford Hirlinger, Beresan Winery, Balboa Winery, Basel Cellars, Trio Vintners, Kontos Cellars, Dunham Cellars, Cavu Cellars, and Waterbrook.

Our first stop was at Woodward Canyon where we were met by Kellie Berg, the tasting room manager, who was extremely friendly and nice to us. I tasted six of their wines with my favorites being their 2016 Burgundy styled Chardonnay, NV Columbia Red Wine (52% Cabernet Sauvignon, 25% Merlot, and 14% Syrah), Artist Series #15 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon (which actually had a bit of Syrah and Merlot in it) and 2014 Estate Red.  The best value of the bunch was the NV Columbia Red Wine, which at $26 is a true bargain.

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Heritage Trail Vineyards

Location

Heritage Trail Vineyards is located on 38 rolling acres in the Quinebaug-Shetucket National Heritage Corridor, an area federally registered as one of America’ s most scenic destinations. In addition, the vineyard is close to many of Connecticut’s tourist attractions, including Mystic Seaport, the Mohegan Sun, and Foxwoods Resort Casino.

Heritage Trail Vineyards invites you to join them for light food, great wine, and a wonderful setting. In winter, warm your hands at the fire; in summer, stroll the property or admire the view from a sunny deck. They are looking forward to seeing you soon!

Hours

May through December, Heritage Trail is open Friday, Saturday, and Sunday from 11:00 to 5:00 p.m. and January through April, they are open by appointment. Please call the vineyard at (860) 376-0659 to arrange a tasting or to purchase wine.

How to get there

From New Haven, take I-95 North to I-395 North to exit 83A (Lisbon), then take a left onto Route 169. Heritage Trail Vineyards will be approximately three miles up the road on your left. From the Boston area, take I-395 South to Exit 87 to Route 12; go south on Route 12 to sign “Route 169” (about 4 miles); turn right on Butt’s Bridge Road and go to Route 169 (2 miles); take left onto Route 169. The winery is two miles down the road.

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Tips for Writing a Great Resume

Your resume is a compilation of credentials that lets potential employers know what you have achieved. Your cover letter tells them why your achievements are important and why you are a good fit for the position you are applying for. It acts as your spokesman and markets you to prospective employers.

A good cover letter should have three sections: a brief opening, middle and a closing. Each part contains crucial information and needs to be strongly worded.

The Opening Paragraph

It is here that you clearly identify the position you are applying for. Tell the reader how you learned about the job. If you are responding to an ad you saw or if a friend referred you, say so. More importantly, explain why you are interested in the job or in this company in particular. Make them believe you want to work at this company, in this position.

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Knipprath Cellars, Spokane

Knipprath Cellars Is Doing It Right

I recently had the pleasure of visiting one of Spokane, Washington’s most unique wineries, Knipprath Cellars. The winery is located in an old schoolhouse. It’s very quaint, though a bit chilly the day I visited. I was greeted at the top of the stairs by Sinay, who was manning (or in this case, womaning) the tasting room this particular day. See also this interview with Henning Knipprath of Knipprath Cellars. Knipprath is well-known for their Spiced Wine, Port, and some other pretty unique offerings. Knipprath is located in the Spokane Valley, at the historic Parkwater Schoolhouse.

I knew very little about Knipprath Cellars except that there WAS one, so I asked many questions and Sinay answered them one by one. I found out that Knipprath Cellars is a family-owned winery that just celebrated ten years of being a full-time winery. All in all, I tasted 13 different wines including Roussanne, Syrah, Tempranillo, Merlot and a whole slew of dessert wines, which seems to be their niche.

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Best American Wines

Let’s also take a look at a few more interesting American wines. California is around the world renown for its quality wines. Check out the following wines that are really standing out in a market that has the largest number of varieties of agricultural produce in the world: WINE!

2013 Petite Sirah “Lovett Vineyard”, Red Hills

Deeply saturated and inky in the glass – ruby purple with violet glints.  The aromas set the stage for this wine – quintessential Petite Sirah notes of blackberry jam, rhubarb pie, baking spices, and blueberries are buoyed by a set of savory aromatics of cigar box, wet gravel, espresso, and fine oak.  The palate mirrors the nose – rich, ripe berry and cherry notes with underpinnings of dark chocolate, and coffee and a hint of hoppy porter.

Generous fine-grained tannins provide a backbone to the long, lingering finish of cassis and bittersweet chocolate.   With this bottling, the richness and ripeness of fruit are perfectly matched by bright, youthful acidity, giving the wine freshness and balance in this early stage and promising the potential for longer-term cellaring over the next 5-7 years.  As the wine matures, the jammy notes will transform into plush, darker fruit while the tannins soften and become velvety on the palate, slowly transforming into a highly nuanced and elegant wine.

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